Horse Racing: The Secret Of Thinking Big Money And Not Thinking Small Money

The secret of thinking big money and not thinking little money is a frame of mind the player need to have if he or she is to make big money. The mass majority of players that consider Return On Investment (ROI) in racing usually consider making a few hundred dollars in profit over a few wagers spent. Or an ROI of a few cents or nickles on the dollars. There’s another way which is as simple and straight forward but much more powerful. This is the case where you intend to play racing as a job or career and play 1,000’s of races over several or more years and not as a pass time.

An example: in the course of 10 years exact at any major track in the USA when the money is summed for all wager types for such a time period it adds into more than several millions of dollars. If you sum the total for 4-5 major tracks it reaches over $30,000,000 for that same period. $30,000,000: THAT’S REAL NAVY, SON! If you’re thinking about getting 5%-70% of that then you’re thinking big money, big business and not gambling. Why? Because you’ll never see the day when gambling will net you that type of money. You need design and not luck.

Thinking small money will not do so either. And you can put your money down on that and win. The secret of thinking big money and not thinking small money in racing is to think big money in the right way. To repeat: the right way. Of course you can play the pick 6 and get lucky but you can’t repeat it at will. It was just an accident. The money is just as real of course. There’s a way to know statistically and of seeing the game a certain way. There’s a way to create a flexible firm plan.

An example of Return On Investment or ROI. In one year exact you put $500 in A and $600 in B investments. You get back $75 on A and $90 on B in profits. Turn each into a fraction and turn each into a percent. Such as: $75/$500 = 15% and $90/$600 = 15% respectively. Another example: in one year exact you put $1,000 each into investments A and B. You get back $75 and $90 respectively in profit. Turn A and B into fractions and turn each into a percent. Such as: $75/$1,000 = 7.5% and $90/$1,000 = 9% respectively. This is called rate of return.

To obtain a large percent of that money and the way to do that is to know and practice handicapping and profitcapping very well. Handicapping is predicting the order of finish positions of races well. Profitcapping is predicting the profit to be made from the in money positions from wager types and the payouts over months and years while dealing with each race on an individual and personal one on one basis. Don’t seek to make a few hundred dollars but 100’s of 1,000’s of dollars or a few millions of dollars. For this you need a business, a statistical and a thinking big money view-point. This is partially the secret of thinking big money and not thinking small money.

The Big 3 Factors in Choosing a Sports Handicapper

Are you a sports fan who likes to bet on his favorite team? Are you a casual bettor or do you bet on sports seriously? For casual bettors who enjoy plopping down a few bucks on a game of interest, there is not so much a need to pay for a professional service that provides betting advice. It’s just a little money on an interesting game, and it makes spectating a little more enjoyable. But for those individuals who take their sports betting seriously, they may want to consider hiring a sports handicapping service.

In many cases, it can make sense to hire a handicapping service, but you need to understand exactly what you are paying for. You’re not hiring the handicapper (also known as “capper”), for some additional counsel. They shouldn’t be viewed as just another opinion. If you are going to pay handicappers, then you should take their tips and bet them accordingly. Picking and choosing which bets to play may not be the best strategy.

So let us assume you have made the decision to hire a capper because you are serious about making money in the world of sports betting. What should you look for in your search? Although there are many similarities in the various cappers, there are also some differences as well. In this article we will review three of the most important considerations.

Look for an Experienced Handicapper

There is an old saying that there is no substitute for experience and that is very true in the world of sports handicapping. Make no mistake that capping sports games successfully takes a lot of hard work. There are many variables to consider and these guys need time in the business to really figure out how to do their jobs effectively. That usually involves many years in the business. Thus, look for a handicapper with at least ten years of solid experience handicapping sports.

Find a Handicapper Who Posts Results Publicly

In the business of sports betting, there are many handicappers who prefer to keep their identities and results private. That may serve their own needs well, but for me, I want to know who I am hiring and what their track record for successful capping has been. Look for someone who isn’t afraid of being transparent, if not with their identity, at least with their results. It is common knowledge that even the top handicappers are only successful 55-60% of the time. Make sure the handicapper has a success rate of a minimum of 55%, so that you can bet profitably over the long run. After all, you are paying him for his expertise and he should therefore be willing to own up to all of his picks.

Ensure the Pricing Structure Fits into Your Budget

The bottom line in professional sports betting is making money. The bookmaker must get paid. The handicapper must get paid, and you, the bettor, wants to get paid too. Before you hire a handicapper, make sure you have a complete understanding of his prices. Are you paying for a subscription? If so, how long does it last, and is the renewal rate the same? Calculate the handicapper’s fees into your formula to determine how successful you need to be to profitable. Higher priced handicappers are more suited for the bigger bettors.

Conclusion

Who is the best sports handicapper? The answer may surprise you. There are quite a few good ones out there. If you choose one that has been capping for at least ten years, posts their results publicly, and has a fair pricing structure, then you have done your homework and are ready to dive into sports betting with a good partner.

Illegal Sports Gambling Is Big Business! Will It Finally Become Legal? Supreme Court to Decide

No matter what sports season we’re in, you probably have a favorite sport you relish following. Maybe March madness college basketball, the NFL, baseball, hockey, golf, or soccer. Perhaps you would like to make a little bet, but many sports fans in the United States are leery of the legitimacy and legality of internet gambling. If you live in the United States, your legal sports betting options at brick and mortar casinos are limited to Nevada, and to some degree at Delaware racetracks.

The Supreme Court has heard arguments on a New Jersey challenge which would permit sports gambling at its casinos and racetracks. If the court rules in favor of New Jersey, Gaming experts predict that most states will jump on the bandwagon to legalization, in order to fill state coffers with tax revenue.

If you’re unfamiliar with the particulars of how to bet on sports, the following describes how it all works:

Sports Betting Jargon

Before we get into the specifics, here’s a little jargon explanation to help you understand the process:

  • Action – A term for all the betting activity that happens during an event.
  • Handle – The total amount of money wagered on events.
  • Spread – Giving one of the two teams points to even out the betting action.
  • Sports Books – Establishments that take bets on sporting events.
  • Juice – A percentage of the win taken from a bettor that won an even money bet. Sometimes called the vig, which is short for vigorish.

Types of Bets

There are many different types of bets. By far, football draws the most action with the biggest handle. The Super Bowl alone draws over $100 million in legal betting activity, and over three billion (that’s billion with a B!) illegal wagers. Now you see why states want a piece of the action.

  • Even Money Bets – Players betting on only one team to beat another. The sports book takes the juice/vig from the winning payout amount. A common vig is $11 for $10. (Bettor wages $11, wins $10.) House keeps $1. Most bets will have a point spread (line). If the player is picking the underdog, S/he will take points. If the bettor is picking the favorite, S/he is laying (giving) points.
  • Parlay Bets – Betting on multiple (two or more) teams to win. Here’s a scenario on a point spread ticket. Let’s assume that on event #1, Tampa Bay is playing at Green Bay with GB favored to win by at least 3 points. In event #2, Buffalo is playing at Miami and BUF is expected to win by at least 7 points. Your game ticket would look something like this:

Event Visitor Vs Home

1. TB GB. -3

2 BUF. -7 MIA

This means that if you bet on GB they must win by more than 3 points. A bet on BUF would require them to win by more than 7 points. By choosing the favorites you are laying (giving) points. If you were to put your money on GB and MIA, you would be taking (receiving) the points.

One way to eliminate confusion is to jot down a spread score before the games start. for example on this ticket:

The score before the game starts is:

  1. TB 3 GB 0
  2. MIA 7 BUF 0

When the games are over just give the points to the underdogs. In most jurisdictions, ties lose for the player. In other jurisdictions the prize payout for one tie is reduced to the next lowest payout factor. A common play in casinos is a four team pick for 10X the bet.Bet $10, win $100, but you can wager from two to twelve games. The more games you play, the higher the winning payouts.

  • Over/Under – One scenario is betting that the final score ill be over or under a certain number a preset number.
  • Prop Bets – A proposition bet is where you predict the outcome of a preset number of props on a single ticket. Example: Total field goals over/under 4. Total interceptions over/under 3. Total sacks over/under 2. Total receiving yards, total yards, and the list goes on and on.

If you visit Vegas or other jurisdictions that permit sports gambling, Good Luck!